Iran’s Officials Confiscate House of Political Prisoners

0
49
Fatemeh Mosanna and Hassan Sadeghi

By Jubin Katiraie

The Iranian authorities have made the children of two political prisoners homeless by confiscating their homes.

The Execution of Imam Khomeini’s Order confiscated the home of husband and wife political prisoners Fatemeh Mosanna and Hassan Sadeghi, who have been in prison for four years, as part of a previous verdict issued by a Revolutionary Court in Tehran.

A source with knowledge of the matter said that Mosanna received the notice that her home in eastern Tehran would be confiscated during her temporary leave from prison.

This made the couple’s children and Mosanna’s 89-year-old mother homeless. All of their property has now been confiscated, including what Sadeghi inherited from his father.

This latest seizure comes just 14 months after the couple’s shop was confiscated, leaving the family with no source of income.

Their son, Iman Sadeghi, said at the time: “We have no other source of income. Now they are putting their hand on our house where we live in Tehran and if they take that away from us, we will have to live on the street because we have nowhere else to go.”

The Execution of Imam Khomeini’s Order, also known as “Setad”, is under the direct control of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. It has seized the assets of political prisoners, religious minorities, and other groups since the mullahs stole power during the 1979 Revolution.

Sadeghi and Mosanna were given 15-year prison sentences in 2015 for organizing and attending a memorial service for Sadeghi’s father Gholamhossein in January 2013. They were arrested at the ceremony because the father was a member of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK), an opposition group banned in Iran since the 1980s.

Also in the 1980s, Sadeghi served six years in prison, from age 15 to 21, for taking part in political activities linked to the MEK. Meanwhile, Mosanna and her mother Ferdows Mahboubi served two and four years in prison respectively on similar charges.

Mosanna’s brothers, Ali, Mostafa, and Morteza were all executed for in the 1980s for the vague charge of “collaboration with the MEK”. They were among thousands of MEK members and political prisoners executed in secret and without a fair trial during that decade.

Many of them were young people, some just teenagers, who were imprisoned because of their political opinions and executed when the mullahs’ felt their grip on power getting shakier. Then-Supreme Leader Ruhollah Khomeini became nervous about the MEK’s support and ordered that 30,000 MEK-linked political prisoners be murdered in the summer of 1988.

The massacre was kept a secret, with the victims buried in mass graves that were often destroyed or concreted over to hide evidence of this crime against humanity.

 

Read More:

Iran Hangs Eleven on Eve of Ramadan